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Is the Unemployment Rate Misleading?

REPOST ARTICLE SOURCE: http://dollarsandcommoncents.net/2012/05/11/is-the-unemployment-rate-misleading/

The April employment statistics were released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics(BLS) last Friday.  The official U.S.unemployment rate for April 2012 dropped to 8.1%.  It hasn’t been this low since January 2009.

According to the BLS, 115,000 new jobs were added to the workforce in April.  Certainly that is good news for the 115,000 who are now employed, and after three years of high unemployment, it’s encouraging to see the rate dropping.

The report has been out for a week, which has given people more opportunity to dig into the numbers.  Unfortunately, the headline is much more encouraging than some of the supporting data.  Here are a few facts to consider

  • 310,000 people left the workforce in April (that’s nearly 3 times as many jobs which were created).  People who are no longer looking for a job contributed more to the reduction in the unemployment rate, than those who obtained a new job.
  • There are 968,000 people looking for work, who are classified as “discouraged.”
  • 7.8 million people are working part-time for economic reasons.
  • 5.1 million people have been unemployed for more than 39 weeks.
  • 324,000 women dropped out of the labor force in the past two months.

So is the unemployment rate misleading?  Personally, I don’t think it’s misleading, but you also shouldn’t take it at face value.  A deeper understanding of the supporting data will provide a better picture of what’s really happening.

Realize the unemployment rate is only an estimate.  No one knows for sure how many people are truly unemployed and looking for work.  For example, many people think it’s misleading to exclude those who have given up looking for work.  While that may be the case for discouraged and frustrated people who can’t find a job, what about those who retire, start their own business or decide to stay home to take care of a family member?  Those people may have no intentions of re-entering the workforce, at least in the near term, so it would also be misleading to count them as unemployed.  Thus, the quandary of who should be classified as unemployed.

I don’t think the unemployment rate is misleading, unless the BLS changes its data collection and classification measures, which happened at the beginning of 2011 (read more here).  Since the BLS hasn’t changed their methodology recently, the drop in the unemployment rate can be considered legitimate.  However, you should investigate some of the supporting data, and draw your own conclusions about the U.S. employment situation.

Since it’s an election year, expect politicians and political pundits to quote the rate as a measure of their job performance or some other elected official and make their political argument for supporting a particular candidate.  Don’t be misled by a headline or political statement, since they rarely tell the whole story.  The unemployment rate may not be misleading, but other people can be.

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